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UN worried about fate of immigrants in Libya

According to the UN Human Rights Office, in recent months, other migrants from Sudan, Eritrea, Somalia and Chad – including children and pregnant women – have been detained and, or will be, expelled at any moment.

AlTaghyeer: Agencies

The UN Human Rights Office expressed grave concern and called on the Libyan authorities to protect the rights of all migrants.

The UN’s concern comes after a series of forced expulsions of asylum seekers and other migrants in was carried out in Libya last month, including the expulsion of two large groups from Sudan.

Human Rights Office spokesperson Robert Colville said that according to information obtained by their team in the field last Monday, a group of 18 Sudanese people were expelled without due process after their transferal from the Ganfouda detention center in Benghazi to the Kufra detention center in southeast Libya.

Both centers are under the control of the Libyan Ministry of the Interior’s Department for Combating Illegal Immigration.

Colville indicated in a press conference at Geneva on Thursday that the migrants were transferred across the Sahara to the border area between Libya and Sudan, where they were left there.

“A month before that, on November 5th, another group of 19 Sudanese was deported to Sudan, also from Ganfouda through the Kufra detention center,” he added.

Other Immigrants

According to the Human Rights Office, in recent months, other migrants from Sudan, Eritrea, Somalia and Chad – including children and pregnant women – have been detained and, or will be, expelled at any moment.

“These expulsions of asylum seekers and other migrants in search of safety and dignity in Libya without due process and procedural safeguards run counter to the prohibition of collective deportation and the principle of forced-return under international human rights and refugee law,” Colville said.

Regarding the Sudanese nationals deported on Monday, for example, he said they had reportedly been arbitrarily arrested, detained, and deported without being given an individual assessment of their circumstances and protection needs, such as the risk of persecution, torture, ill-treatment, or other irreparable harm in their homes.

The nationals were not given access to legal aid, nor were thy able to challenge the legality of the expulsion order, as Colville stated.

In addition, they were not allowed access to relevant United Nations organizations, including the Human Rights Service of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL), during their detention.

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